Falina Enriquez

Associate Professor

fenriquez2@wisc.edu

608-262-0695

5401 Sewell Social Science Bldg.

Carillon Tower in front of Sewell Social Science Building

Links

Falina Enriquez CV

Areas of Focus

Cultural and Linguistic anthropology, Ethnomusicology, Brazil, Semiotics, Neoliberalism, Latin America, Social inequality

Affiliations

Center for Visual Cultures (CVC)

Chican@ and Latin@ Studies (CLS) Program

Global Music and Sound Studies Initiative

Latin American, Caribbean and Iberian Studies Program (LACIS)

Research

As a cultural and linguistic anthropologist, I study music and language as an ensemble that helps us understand how people construct the world and emplace themselves—and others—within it. I focus on the cultural politics of music as a form of artistic practice and labor in Recife, Brazil, a city long known as a uniquely musical place. My works builds on the premise that together, music and language shape and reflect the social order. In studying music and language together, I shed light on how various kinds of people act in relation to socioeconomic processes like neoliberalism, precarity, and structural inequality. The insights that I have developed draw from and contribute to cultural and linguistic anthropology, ethnomusicology, Brazilian studies, Latin American studies, and cultural studies.

Teaching

  • Anthropology 104: Cultural Anthropology and Human Diversity
  • Anthropology 300: Theory and Ethnography
  • Anthropology 330: Race and Culture in Brazil
  • Anthropology 430: Language and Culture
  • Anthropology 860: A History of Anthropological Theory
  • Anthropology 940: Culture and the State in Latin America

Selected publications

2022. The Costs of the Gig Economy: Musical Entrepreneurs and the Cultural Politics of Inequality in Northeastern Brazil. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. https://www.press.uillinois.edu/books/?id=p086687

2022. “New Forms of Musical Belonging in Contemporary Brazil.” In The Routledge Companion to Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Latin American Literary and Cultural Forms, edited by Guillermina de Ferrari and Mariano Siskind, 456-465. Abingdon, UK; New York: Routledge. https://www.routledge.com/The-Routledge-Companion-to-Twentieth-and-Twenty-First-Century-Latin-American/Ferrari-Siskind/p/book/9780367179885

2022. “How to ‘Get By’ in a Crisis: Strategic Flexibility among Brazilian Musical Entrepreneurs.” Current Anthropology 63 (5): 601–7. https://doi.org/10.1086/721956.

2022.  Kohl, Owen and Falina Enriquez. “Falina Enriquez discusses her new book, The Costs of the Gig Economy.” CaMP Anthropology blog (Department of Anthropology, Indiana University Bloomington). https://campanthropology.org/2022/09/23/falina-enriquez-discusses-her-new-book-the-costs-of-the-gig-economy/

2022. “Pernambuco and Bahia’s Musical ‘War’: Contemporary Music, Intraregional Rivalry, and Branding in Northeastern Brazil.” Luso-Brazilian Review 59 (1): 22–60.

2021. “Tempered Hopes: (Re)Producing the Middle Class in Recife’s Alternative Music Scene.” In Precarious Democracy: Ethnographies of Hope, Despair and Resistance in Brazil, edited by Benjamin Junge, Sean T. Mitchell, Alvaro Jarrín, and Lucia Cantero, 142–54. New Brunswick, N.J: Rutgers University Press. https://www.rutgersuniversitypress.org/precarious-democracy/9781978825659

  • Portuguese translation:

2022. “Esperanças Moderadas: (Re)produzindo a classe média na cena musical alternativa do Recife.” In Democracia Precária: Etnografias de esperança, desespero e resistencia no Brasil, edited by Alvaro Jarrín, Benjamin Junge, Sean T. Mitchell, Lucia Cantero, and Karina Biondi, 234-354. Porto Alegre: Editora Zouk. https://www.editorazouk.com.br/pd-918ba6-democracia-precaria.html?ct=&p=1&s=1

Recife Antigo: The Downsides of Upgrading Tourist Destinations.” The Anthropology of   Tourism Interest Group (ATIG) (blog). April 21. https://atig.americananthro.org/recife-antigo/

2018. “Business, Transnationalism, and Patrimony: Comparing Entrepreneurial Musicians in Recife, Pernambuco.” Suomen Antropologi 43 (1): 6–27. https://doi.org/10.30676/jfas.v43i1.69099.